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This Just In ...

Kevin Fischer is a veteran broadcaster, the recipient of over 150 major journalism awards from the Milwaukee Press Club, the Wisconsin Associated Press, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, the Wisconsin Bar Association, and others. He has been seen and heard on Milwaukee TV and radio stations for over three decades. A longtime aide to state Senate Republicans in the Wisconsin Legislature, Kevin can be seen offering his views on the news on the public affairs program, "InterCHANGE," on Milwaukee Public Television Channel 10, and heard filling in on Newstalk 1130 WISN. He lives with his wife, Jennifer, and their lovely young daughter, Kyla Audrey, in Franklin.

Culinary no-no #118

Culinary no-no's


TODAY, CULINARY NO-NO CELEBRATES ITS 2ND ANNIVERSARY.

IT DEBUTED ON FATHER’S DAY TWO YEARS AGO AND REMAINS ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR FEATURES ON THIS JUST IN...

THANK YOU FOR YOUR INTEREST AND SUPPORT.


Apparently I did a very foolish thing a few weeks ago. I had my landscaping service people come to the house and fertilize the lawn.

Wrong move.

Instead, I should have let those weeds grow, pulled them, and then sold them. Yes, sold them.

To who, you ask?

I could have set up a stand in the driveway like a vendor at farmer’s market. Or I could have approached grocery stores or certain restaurant chefs.


Weeds are the new hip and trendy food item. Some were selling in the nation’s capital for $9 a pound. They’re selling like hotcakes at grocery stores, racking up millions in sales.

Is this newly accepted delicacy a product of the poor economy? Or is it considered an exciting addition to gourmet menus? It seems the answer is both.

Dandelions, purslane, lamb’s quarters, pokeweed, and sting nettles are no longer ending up in the garbage. They’re finding their way onto dinner plates.

Culinary history tells us edible weeds were in vogue until World War II when processed foods became the norm. Now the pendulum has shifted again. If you’re trying to save because of the economy, some experts say you can succeed by harvesting in your own neighborhood, and the search will be invigorating to boot. Upper-end consumers are also reportedly seeking out the new greens.

Because weeds have what we all know is an uncanny ability to survive almost anything, they are regarded in some circles to be superfoods able to unleash all kinds of health benefits.

At the same time, some weeds are considered extremely dangerous. Go out hunting for them alone? Not on your life is the advice given by the same folks who are insisting this stuff is really good for you.

OK.

Am I missing something here?

I haven’t seen any of this junk being sold at Sendik’s or at any other grocery store.

Have you seen any of the above-mentioned items on any menu lately?

For that matter, no signs have popped up like weeds selling them at any roadside stand.

I am unaware of any weed-foraging clubs or scavenger hunts.

Is the economy really that bad that I need to whip up a salad of onions, garlic, and dandelions?

And if I’m following this correctly, eating this is cool and neat and trendy and healthy and it might kill me.

Count me out and pass the watercress.

Read more in the
Wall Street Journal.

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