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Ms. Elaine Kneeous

Jennifer is a one in a million stay-at-home mom. (More like one OF a million stay at home moms!) She graduated from a liberal arts college but there is nothing liberal OR artsy about her. She is married to Kevin Fischer of This Just In, and together they have a beautiful young daughter Kyla Audrey. In no particular order she loves dogs, wine, a good bargain, her family, pizza, and entertaining. Follow her blog of all things miscellaneous including but not limited to cooking and baking, entertaining and party planning, being a mommy, and homekeeping.

Elsa, don't change a thing

I remarked to my best friend the other day that this is such a cool time to be Kyla’s age.  (Generally speaking with the way society is going I don’t feel this way.  But I was referring specifically to Disney-related things.)

When I was nearly five years old, I certainly didn’t have a new Disney princess – and a little girl princess at that! – and a brand-new animated film that I could call mine.  Kyla has Sofia the First as well as Frozen that are truly for her generation of girls.

She is at the perfect age to believe in all the magic that surrounds fairy tales, movies, and animation.  I’ll never forget the first time she saw a video of Ariel Winter (the voice talent for Sofia) singing “Rise and Shine” from the series.  She looked at me with wonder & surprise and said, “Mommy!  She sounds just like Sofia!”  I wasn’t about to burst that bubble, I merely agreed that she certainly did.

I enjoy the whole Princess concept.  I don’t view it as something that will undermine my daughter’s ability to grow up to be a productive citizen.  And I’m not one of those who try my darndest to find a hidden agenda or anti-feminist message in every song, show, or movie.

I’ve talked to my fair share of moms who have seen Frozen with their kids.  (You don’t need to be a “movie critic” for Slate to do this.)  We’ve discussed the movie’s plot, themes, and of course the music.  And I’ve gotta tell you not ONE has said to me, “But isn’t there a moment in ‘Let It Go’ that kind of bugs you?”

Who comes UP with these things?  I guess a “movie critic” who needs to justify their occupation.  I think Dana Stevens (and others like her) need to be reminded that a movie critic’s job should be based on the definition of critique, “a detailed analysis and assessment of something, esp. a literary, philosophical, or political theory” and not criticism, “the expression of disapproval of someone or something based on perceived faults or mistakes.”

By her own admission, Dana can’t “Let it Go.”  But she should.


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