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This Just In ...

Kevin Fischer is a veteran broadcaster, the recipient of over 150 major journalism awards from the Milwaukee Press Club, the Wisconsin Associated Press, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, the Wisconsin Bar Association, and others. He has been seen and heard on Milwaukee TV and radio stations for over three decades. A longtime aide to state Senate Republicans in the Wisconsin Legislature, Kevin can be seen offering his views on the news on the public affairs program, "InterCHANGE," on Milwaukee Public Television Channel 10, and heard filling in on Newstalk 1130 WISN. He lives with his wife, Jennifer, and their lovely young daughter, Kyla Audrey, in Franklin.

Why didn't people vote in November 2012? (It's not what the left would have you believe)

“An estimated 700,000 young minority voters could be barred from voting in November because of photo ID laws passed across the country in recent years, according to a new study.

“The number of minority voters under the age of 30 likely to be disenfranchised by these new voting laws -- passed overwhelmingly by Republican-led legislatures across the country -- is a conservative estimate, according to the study's authors. The actual number of voters in that category who could be disenfranchised is probably closer to 1 million, they said.”
The Huffington Post, September 2012

That’s been the mantra of the left. Photo ID laws would be the big obstacle to voting thrown up by evil, nasty Republicans who want to prevent the Democrat voting bloc from getting to the polls. Photo ID laws would disenfranchise.

Really?

Brand new data from the US Census Bureau not only focused on voters but on those who decided not to or didn’t vote, the non-voters if you will.

Why didn’t they vote? If you listen to the lefty media and lefty special interest groups, it’s because photo ID laws would make it nearly impossible for the poor, elderly, and especially minorities to even head out the door to travel to polling places.

The Census Bureau did a survey of 19,141 registered citizens who did not vote in November of 2012. Here are their reasons why broken down by percentage:

Too busy, conflicting schedule: 18.9%

Not interested: 15.7%

Illness or disability: 14.0%

Did not like candidates or campaign issues: 12.7%

Other reason: 11.1%

Out of town: 8.6%

Registration problems: 5.5%

Forgot to vote: 3.9%

Transportation problems: 3.3%

Inconvenient polling place: 2.7%

Bad weather conditions: 0.8%


My guess is that photo ID issues would have fallen under registration problems. But even if all of the “registration problems” entailed photo ID, that means 94.5% of non-voters had other excuses why they didn’t cast a ballot.

Disenfranchised? Hardly. If anything, apathy is the major reason for not voting.

Other key findings by the Census Bureau indicate minorities, especially Blacks are voting in greater numbers suggesting they’re not experiencing difficulties getting to the polls:

“In comparison to the election of 2008, about 1.7 million additional Black voters reported going to the polls in 2012, as did about 1.4 million additional Hispanics and about 550,000 additional Asians. The number of non-Hispanic White voters decreased by about 2 million between 2008 and 2012. Since 1996, this is the only example of a race group showing a decrease in net voting from one presidential election to the next, and it indicates that the 2012 voting population expansion came primarily from minority voters.”

“In 2012, Blacks voted at a higher rate (66.2 percent) than non-Hispanic Whites (64.1 percent) for the first time since the Census Bureau started publishing voting rates by the eligible citizenship population in 1996.”


“Between 1996 and 2012, the Black population, the Asian population, and the Hispanic population all saw their shares of the eligible electorate and the voting population increase. Non-Hispanic Whites were the only race group whose shares of the eligible electorate and the voting population did not increase.”

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