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This Just In ...

Kevin Fischer is a veteran broadcaster, the recipient of over 150 major journalism awards from the Milwaukee Press Club, the Wisconsin Associated Press, the Northwest Broadcast News Association, the Wisconsin Bar Association, and others. He has been seen and heard on Milwaukee TV and radio stations for over three decades. A longtime aide to state Senate Republicans in the Wisconsin Legislature, Kevin can be seen offering his views on the news on the public affairs program, "InterCHANGE," on Milwaukee Public Television Channel 10, and heard filling in on Newstalk 1130 WISN. He lives with his wife, Jennifer, and their lovely young daughter, Kyla Audrey, in Franklin.

Wusses of the Week

 
Earlier this week, the Cincinnati Reds clinched the NL Central Division title in dramatic fashion.

 

 

 



Cincinnati Reds' Jay Bruce reacts after hitting a home run off Houston Astros relief pitcher Tim Byrdak in the ninth inning of a baseball game Tuesday, Sept. 28, 2010, in Cincinnati. Cincinnati clinched the NL Central with the 3-2 win. Astros first baseman Carlos Lee is at right. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

Bruce's theatrics touched off the obligatory celebration with a touch of the bubbly.




The Reds drank up……and lit up.




Cincinnati Reds owner Bob Castellini smokes a cigar after the Reds defeated the Houston Astros 3-2 in a baseball game to clinch the NL Central, Tuesday, Sept. 28, 2010, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Tom Uhlman)

Castellini wasn't alone. Several Reds players brought out the stogies.

Oh oh.

Cue the busybodies.

Ohio, like Wisconsin, has a heavy-handed smoking ban that happens to include the Great American Ballpark in Cincinnati. At least five individuals who apparently had nothing else better to do in their meaningless lives picked up the phone and called a special hotline to complain about the cigars. The Ohio trampling of rights, I mean, the Ohio law stipulates that if at least five people complain about a violation of the smoking ban at a particular place, a pencil-pushing bureaucrat must be deployed to …….investigate.

Wanna bet those five ninnies hate baseball? That makes this story even more nonsensical. Your hometown team wins a storybook game to go into the playoffs and you get your nose out of joint because the team celebrated with cigars?

You have to feel sorry for Rocky Merz of the Cincinnati Health Department who has the unenviable task of having to answer a flood of media calls inquiring the obvious, “Whatcha gonna do about it?”


Here’s the answer from the Cincinnati Enquirer:

“State law requires a health inspector to go out within 30 days at about the same time of day as the alleged violation, Merz said. That means an inspector might be attending one of the playoff games to see if anyone is smoking then.

‘We come in unannounced, obviously,’ he said.”

“I’m from the government and I’m here to see if anyone is smoking a cigar.”

What a joke.


 

 

 

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